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Alliderm Gel, 30ml

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£10.35
Availability: translation missing: en.general.icons.icon_check_circle icon Out of stock

Alliderm Gel is the perfect complement to AllicinMAX capsules.

It is for topical application (skin surface) and has a soothing and beneficial way of delivering allicin to where it is needed most. The gel has a very pleasant aroma and is not at all sticky or messy.

Alliderm Gel should be applied as often as required, but at least once daily, to the affected area.

It may also be added to a dressing or sticking plaster.

Ingredients: Aqua, Allicin Liquid, Glycerin, Xanthan Gum, Phenoxyethanol, Aloe Barbadensis, Allantoin, Glyceryl Acrylate/Acrylic Acid Copolymer, Ethylhexylglycerin, Caprylyl Glycol, Sodium Hydroxide, Citric Acid.

About Allicin

What is allicin? When fresh garlic is cut or crushed, an amino acid, alliin, combines with an enzyme, allinase and a chemical reaction starts. The first compound that is formed is Allicin. Allicin, generated from fresh garlic, changes into a series of other sulphur compounds, known as thiosulphinates. Allicin is described as the 'mother' substance of garlic, which is responsible for the majority of its remarkable properties.

A Brief History of Garlic.

It is thought that Garlic originated in the Kirgiz Desert in Siberia around 7000 years ago. It was imported into Ancient Egypt to feed the slaves who built the pyramids and to keep them fit and healthy. Since that time, garlic has played an important part in almost every civilisation across the globe. In Ancient Greece, garlic was consumed in large quantities to improve circulation and build strength. Over the last century, an enormous amount of research has been published all over the world to confirm the many beneficial properties of garlic.

To bring Allicin for all to benefit, we have pioneered a patented process which provides biologically active stabilised Allicin in our AllicinMAX range of products.

Details Click to see more

Research

More than 2000 scientific papers citing allicin are available on 'Athens', the university and scientific community database or you can look in Pub Med.

Allicin has been tested in vitro (in the lab) and proved effective against a wide spectrum of otherwise resilient threats.

In vivo (in life), allicin tests very positively. It has been used recently, for example, in trials led by Dr R Cutler (Queen Mary University, London). The papers are available on a Google Scholar search (Dr R R Cutler, allicin).

These products are classified as Dietary Supplements and as such are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Of course due to government restrictions we are not allowed to tell you anything about them! So just pop "allicin" into Google Scholar and see what you can find.